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Gardening tips for shifting early Spring weather

Early Spring gardening tips for shifting weather patterns

First it was cold, then it was hot, now, it's somewhere in the middle. Our local plants are getting confused, and as a result, we're seeing early blooms.

"You've got your Bradford Pears you see blooming. A lot of you see those along a lot of the highways and you see them in the landscapes everywhere. Also you have Redbuds getting ready to pop, you have Kwanza Cherries beginning to pop, some Weeping Cherries I've seen trying to pop some color," says Evergreen Garden Center general manager Karen Gibson.

These early blooms have been jump started by unseasonably warm temperatures.

"We had the warmest February on record in the Tri-Cities, and it was also the third wettest, so it's certainly been feeling more like Spring than Winter recently," says WCYB meteorologist David Boyd.

Moving toward early spring, temperatures will continue to shift.

"It's typical to see these ups and downs in March, and even April, and we can see frost through April and sometimes into early May as well, so that's why you have to be careful on what you plant this time of year," Boyd says.

With the possibility of frost in the next couple of months, there are ways to protect early blooms.

"Protect by putting sheets or frost cloth over anything that is blooming, if you want to protect those blooms," Gibson says.

If you’re looking for a pop of color in your landscaping now, there is a type of flower that can be planted early.

"Pansies you can plant, you get some pretty colors with pansies. That's about the only thing that you're really going to be able to plant as far as blooming to get that colorful blooming, up until you start planting your annuals," Gibson says.

You can also get started on your garden.

"Cabbages, your broccoli, your cauliflower, your Brussel sprouts, things like that, that's cold crops. Also you can plant some peas right now, and you can plant potatoes, and you can plant onions," Gibson says.

The frost period will end in mid-May.

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