The Birthplace of Country Music Museum has several events scheduled for March

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WCYB Photo

Rene Rodgers from the Birthplace of Country Music Museum discusses various events going on at the museum at noon.


The Birthplace of Country Music Museum will have a special exhibit called Real Folk: Passing on Trades and Traditions through the Virginia Folklife Apprenticeship Program.

The exhibit will open on March 6 and be up until August 2.

The Birthplace of Country Music Museum's press release on the exhibit:

Since 2002, the Virginia Folklife Apprenticeship Program at Virginia Humanities has brought together over 150 experienced master artists and eager apprentices, ensuring various art forms are passed on in ways that are conscious of history and faithful to tradition. All forms of Virginia’s expressive culture – from the Appalachian hills and the Chesapeake shore to new immigrant traditions brought to the state – are represented, including letterpress printing, mandolin making, African-American gospel singing, quilting, old-time banjo playing, Mexican folk dancing, classical Iranian and Persian music, broom making, and more. The master artists comprise some of Virginia’s most celebrated practitioners of folk traditions both old and new to Virginia, and the apprentices learn their chosen craft not in classrooms or lecture halls, but in their traditional contexts, such as local dance halls, churches, woodshops, stables, and garages – making the passing on of these crafts even more meaningful.

Real Folk: Passing on Trades & Traditions through the Virginia Folklife Apprenticeship Program gives viewers an inside look at these traditions and the people who are keeping them alive, helping to ensure that Virginia’s treasured folkways remain in good keeping for years to come.

This exhibit, on display at the Birthplace of Country Music Museum March 6—August 2, 2020, was produced through a partnership between the museum and the Virginia Folklife Program.

A variety of complementary programs will be offered to go along with Real Folk; keep an eye on our events page to learn more.


The Birthplace of Country Music Museum will also be hosting a free screening of the Appalshop documentary Hazel Dickens: It’s Hard to Tell the Singer from the Song, part of our 2020 Film Series.

The film screening will be onThursday, March 26, 2020 at 12:00 p.m., 2:00 p.m. and 4:00 p.m. at the museum's Performance Theater.

The Birthplace of Country Music Museum's press release on the film screening:

From the coalfields of West Virginia to the factories of Baltimore, Hazel Dickens has lived the songs she sings. A pioneering woman in bluegrass and hardcore country music, Hazel has influenced generations of songwriters and musicians. Her songs of hard work, hard times, and hardy souls have bolstered working people at picket lines and union rallies throughout the land. Her piercing vocals power the soundtracks for Harlan County USA and Matewan. The Washington Post described her as “a living legend of American music, a national treasure,” and in 2001, the National Endowment for the Arts awarded her a National Heritage Fellowship. In this intimate portrait, interviews with Hazel and fellow musicians such as Alison Krauss, Naomi Judd, and Dudley Connell are interwoven with archival footage, recent performances, and 16 powerful songs including “Mama’s Hand,” “ Working Girl Blues,” and “Black Lung.”

Hazel Dickens: It’s Hard to Tell the Singer from the Song profiles a “modern” woman dealing with contemporary issues from a feminist perspective, which has evolved from her own experiences: being Appalachian, being displaced physically and culturally, being poor and working class, being a woman artist in a man’s world, and being a bearer of tradition.


The Birthplace of Country Music Museum has several other events scheduled for the month of March, to see a complete list or for more information, visit https://www.birthplaceofcountrymusic.org/events/.

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